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Citing

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Citing: What, Why, When

What is it?

To quote or refer to an authority outside oneself, usually in support of a point or conclusion or by way of explanation or example

Source:  Reitz, Mary L. Online Dictionary for Library and Information Science (ODLIS).  ABC-CLIO, 2010. Web. 08 Apr. 2011.

Why do it?

  • Give credit to source of information
  • Avoid plagiarism
  • Allow reader to find your research source
  • Provide credibility to your work

When to cite?

  • When you quote, summarize, or paraphrase another's work 
  • When you use facts that are not common knowledge
  • When you use information you found in any outside source (including the Web); anything which is not your OWN original thought

 

Using other people's words or ideas

Quoting

Quotations must be identical to the original, using a narrow segment of the source. They must match the source document word for word and must be attributed to the original author.

Source: "Quoting Paraphrasing and Summarizing."  Owl@Purdue.edu. Pudue University, 2011. Web. 18 Apr. 2011.

Summarizing

Summarizing involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s). Once again, it is necessary to attribute summarized ideas to the original source. Summaries are significantly shorter than the original and take a broad overview of the source material.

Source: "Quoting Paraphrasing and Summarizing."  Owl@Purdue.edu. Pudue University, 2011. Web. 18 Apr. 2011.

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. A paraphrase must also be attributed to the original source. Paraphrased material is usually shorter than the original passage, taking a somewhat broader segment of the source and condensing it slightly.

Source: "Quoting Paraphrasing and Summarizing."  Owl@Purdue.edu. Pudue University, 2011. Web. 18 Apr. 2011.